Advocacy

Suburban superstars: a tale of two walking advocates (part 2)

This is a continuation of our two-part blog series highlighting the walking advocacy of two inspiring women in the suburbs.

This fall the Active Transportation Alliance gathered more than 100 advocates from 63 villages and cities across the region, both online and in-person, to take part in our Bike Walk Every Town suburban advocacy training.

Oak Park swings, misses on Divvy

With Divvy leaving Oak Park, it’s a good time to reflect on how we got here. As a long-time resident of Oak Park, I was happy when the village decided to use a state grant in partnership with Chicago and Evanston to offer Divvy bike share, starting in 2016. 

We know that bike sharing systems like Divvy don’t work well in typical American suburbs where destinations can be far apart and roads unfriendly to people on bikes.

New Divvy pricing offers more options for two-wheeled fun

Today the City of Chicago announced tweaks to the pricing structure for the Divvy bike share system. 

Active Trans is hopeful these changes will encourage more people to try Divvy while also providing existing users with a better experience.

Ultimately, attracting more people to use Divvy will make more resources available for additional stations, expanded access through low-cost membership programs like Divvy for Everyone, and increased outreach and educational programming. 

Suburban superstars: a tale of two walking advocates (part 1)

Last year, as part of the Bike Walk Every Town suburban advocacy program, the Active Transportation Alliance hosted several advocacy skills-building workshops.

We were privileged to cross paths with several dedicated leaders who have spent years working to improve walking, biking and transit conditions in their communities. We wanted to learn what motivated them to volunteer their time and persist through the oftentimes bumpy road of transportation advocacy. 

Parents share their hopes for Milwaukee Ave.

The Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT) is completing a major reconstruction of the highly-trafficked corridor between Belmont Avenue and Logan Boulevard. 

The goals for the project, according to CDOT, are to create public space, improve walkability, achieve Vision Zero by enhancing traffic safety and access to the area, and harmonize the various modes of transportation. This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reshape this popular corridor.

Transportation Talk: Is Chicago delivering what the tech industry needs to grow?

Join TechNexus and the Active Transportation Alliance for a transportation talk about the latest trends in urban mobility and technology, and how these sectors can work together to affect positive change for the people of Chicago and its biggest economic drivers. 

An advocate’s lesson in making a difference

One of the highest priority transportation proposals in McHenry County has been a three-quarter mile multi-use trail along Bull Valley Road just south of the City of McHenry in the northwest suburbs.

This proposed trail extension that runs between Route 31 and the Illinois Prairie Path was also highlighted in the Active Transportation Alliance’s Trail Connect Chicagoland map, which envisions a continuous trail network in Northwest Illinois.

Back on the Bus: Create more effective ways to enforce bus lanes

Of the paltry four miles of dedicated bus lanes that exist in Chicago, the city already struggles with keeping them clear from car traffic.

As we are calling for more bus lanes, Active Trans would also like to ensure the bus lanes are enforced so they are effective in improving bus speed and service.

Back on the Bus: Establish a local dedicated revenue stream to fund transit

Cuts to transit funding were buried in this summer’s state budget agreement. This is unacceptable given the proven economic, environmental and public health benefits of public transit investment. To continue to invest in Chicago’s public transit system, we need a new consistent stream of local funding.

Stay informed with the Mayor’s Bicycle Advisory Council

The Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT) organizes and chairs the Mayor’s Bicycle Advisory Council (MBAC), which meets quarterly at city hall, and is open to the public. The meetings are a great way to stay informed on CDOT projects and learn about new initiatives and improvements to infrastructure around the city