Planning

Stretch of South State St. now easier for walking

State Street between 69th and 79th Streets on Chicago’s South Side has not beeen a welcoming place to walk.

Located just east of the Dan Ryan Expressway, the street is essentially a frontage road, but gets a lot of pedestrian traffic going to Red Line stations located along the median of the Dan Ryan at 69th and 79th Streets.

New report offers guidance on Complete Streets policies

One of the best ways to make a street safer for everyone is making it a Complete Street. These are streets that can be safely used by everyone regardless of their age, ability or travel mode.

Complete Streets are designed to accommodate people walking, biking, using wheelchairs and using transit and cars.

To ensure that these types of streets are built, communities often put in place a Complete Streets policy.

Expansion of TOD zoning makes sense

Housing that is walkable to public transit may soon become attainable to more Chicagoans thanks to a zoning proposal that would double the land that can support transit-convenient development. 

This sort of zoning is called “transit-oriented development,” or “TOD,” which designates land around a train station as focused on providing a mix of housing and commercial opportunities all within a short walk to a transit station. 

Oak Park to get Divvy and Neighborhood Greenways

As a 20-year resident of Oak Park, I’m excited to share a number of changes coming to Oak Park that will improve conditions for biking and walking.

Last week, the village board approved the Oak Park Neighborhood Greenways system as an addendum to its 2008 bike plan. Elements of the 2008 bike plan have already been adopted, such as significantly more and better bike parking near transit stations, bike lanes, wayfinding signs and creating a village government bike fleet. 

Weigh in on Will County transportation plan

As citizens it’s our duty to actively participate in decisions that affect our community. People who live or work in Will County will soon have a chance to do just that at a series of four open houses to discuss transportation systems and future transportation needs and challenges. 

CDOT releases 2015 street resurfacing plan

Though the 2014–15 winter hasn’t (yet) been as cold as 2014’s Chiberia or as snowy as 2011’s Snowpocalypse, the freeze-thaw cycles our region experiences each winter mean that potholes are inevitable.

The good news: Earlier this week, Chicago Department of Transportation released a list of 61 miles of arterial streets to be repaved as part of the city’s new annual standard of repaving at least 300 miles of roads!

CDOT solicits input for placemaking guidelines

As a supporter of the Active Transportation Alliance, you’re most likely familiar with the idea of Complete Streets, the design approach that requires streets to be designed for safe, convenient use by users of all ages, abilities and modes of transportation.

A great pairing to Complete Streets is the philosophy of placemaking, a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates community building and neighborhood identity into designing community spaces.

Any ideas for the 2015 Active Transportation Platform?

With local municipal elections slated for the city and suburbs in 2015, active transportation advocates need to be prepared to speak with a unified voice on the issues we care about.

That's why Active Trans wants to hear from you about your biking, walking, and transit priorities.

Congratulations 2014 Illinois Bike Friendly Communities

The League of American Bicyclists recently announced its Fall 2014 list of Bike Friendly Communities (BFC), with Elgin and Urbana netting new honors.

Elgin received an Honorable Mention and Urbana leapt from Bonze to Gold level. (Elgin also received an Active Trans award this year for the outstanding renovation of its Riverside Drive Promenade and bike path.)  

The Bicycle Friendly Community program provides a roadmap to improve accommodations for bicycling and encouraging people to bike for transportation and recreation.

Public wants improvements in Cook County transportation

For decades transportation planning in Cook County has focused largely on moving cars as quickly as possible through our streets, but it looks like that approach may be changing at last.

The county is currently in the second year of a three-year process to develop a Long Range Transportation Plan. This plan will guide the design and implementation of transportation projects in the region.