Transit

Kansas City builds on BRT’s legacy of success

While most cities in the Midwest are dominated by the automobile, Kansas City is using Bus Rapid Transit to make its downtown more dense, walkable and accessible.

Traditional bus routes provide a critical service but can present challenges to the people who use them. If a bus line has long wait times, restrictive hours, uncomfortable bus stops, and frustratingly slow commutes, taking the bus becomes less appealing.  

Fight for safer streets continues under President Trump

Since Election Day, we have received many questions from members, partners and the media about what the results mean for the future of active transportation in the Chicago region.

At the state level, the passage of the transportation lockbox amendment means we'll stay engaged in the legislative fight to ensure any new money can be spent on biking, walking and public transportation projects.

Your latest local active transportation news

The second issue of our local e-newsletters launched today!

The local e-newsletters offer a quick read on issues related to bicycling, walking and transit in six Chicagoland regions.

There are so many exciting projects underway in many different communities -- read more below and check out our In Your Community webpages to learn about what's new in your neighborhood.

Chicagoland Suburbs

Unveiling the Broadway Metro Express

The Gary Public Transportation Corporation (GPTC) is putting the final touches on plans for Northwest Indiana’s first rapid bus service, the Broadway Metro Express, launching in summer 2017.

The idea of a regional bus rapid transit (BRT) line is a key recommendation in Gary’s Livable Broadway Plan. The plan was developed in a partnership between GPTC, Indiana Department of Transportation, the cities of Gary and Crown Point, and the town of Merrillville. 

Region needs 'mobility partnerships'

In order for people to fully access jobs and contribute to the economy, mobility is key. Yet, in many parts of the Chicago area people do not have convenient access to transit service. 

Despite the Chicago area’s extensive public transit system – the RTA reported 635 million CTA, Metra and Pace trips in 2015 – ridership has been flat or declining in recent years. 

Transit use is greatly affected by its availability and reliability, and our public transit services don’t reach everyone. So, partnerships are needed.

CTA, Divvy receive grant for app upgrades

Chicago’s Divvy bikeshare network is a nationally recognized success story.

As the program continues to expand, many have recognized the need to integrate it with the rest of Chicago’s transit system. This effort took a major step forward last week when Sen. Dick Durbin and Rep. Dan Lipinski announced a $400,000 federal grant to help incorporate Divvy into the Ventra app.  

Belmont Blue Line station to get major upgrade

Mayor Emanuel and CTA President Dorval Carter, Jr. announced on Monday that the Belmont Blue Line stop is getting a $15 million upgrade.

As a part of the city’s Your New Blue program, the station will be transformed into a new Belmont Gateway, seeking to “create an efficient, attractive environment for…customers while also incorporating modern, innovative designs.”

LA's great BRT success story

As overall Chicago transit ridership continues to increase, CTA buses are experiencing a decline in use. The number of people using Chicago’s bus system fell by 1.8 million rides last year, while the L added over 3.5 million trips.  

Safe Roads Amendment about more than just roads

If you’re only seeing the TV and online ads for the proposed “Safe Roads Amendment,” you get the impression it’s only about roads and that it would restrict spending on transit, biking and walking.

The reality is it would lead to a larger pot of money for all modes, including active transportation.

New funding mechanism could lead to more transit investment

While decades of projects show how upgrading and expanding public transit are strong economic investments, it’s still extremely difficult for cities like Chicago to fund major projects in today’s financial climate.

Now city officials are hopeful a new tool will allow transit agencies to leverage the economic benefits of transit investment to secure federal funds for major projects.