Chicago North Side

In your community: local updates from around the region

Looking for the latest news on biking, walking and transit issues in your community? Look no further!

Below you can check out some highlights from our latest local e-newsletters. Our local e-newsletters offer a quick read on issues related to bicycling, walking and transit in six Chicagoland regions.

Park district moves on Lakefront Trail separation

With Ken Griffin’s $12 million donation secured, the Chicago Park District plans to create separated trail space for people biking and people walking between West Fullerton Street and East Ohio Street this spring.

The North Side segment is part of a larger project to create separate paths along the full length of the 18-mile Lakefront Trail by the end of 2018, as Mayor Emanuel announced last December.

Linking the Chicago River Trail on the NW Side

Part of the task of building a continuous Chicago River Trail means ensuring that other local trails connect to it and ensuring that access from local streets is safe and easy.

We took a step in the direction of creating a well connected Chicago River Trail recently when Chicago residents called on the city to finish the Weber Spur Trail on the city's Northwest Side.

The Weber Spur Trail (depicted on the map in the straight dotted line) will provide a key link to the river trail. 

Chicago River Trail advances in North Branch Framework

City planners recently unveiled concepts that support a continuous trail along the Chicago River. These ideas were presented by planners during an update about the North Branch Framework for the Mayor’s Industrial Corridor Modernization Initiative.  

This industrial corridor runs from West Kinzie through West Fullerton Avenues, separating Bucktown from Lincoln Park, and covers all of Goose Island. As the first of twenty-six industrial corridors under review, the North Branch framework will have important implications for future city plans.

Pushing for policy changes to Clear the Way

We know you’ve seen it: delivery trucks obstructing bike lanes, construction sites that render sidewalks treacherous or impassable, and people who think that crosswalks serve as parking spots. We see it a lot, too, and think it’s time to step up enforcement of these law-flouting drivers and construction companies.

Make Milwaukee Ave. in Wicker Park bike friendly

In 2017, Active Trans will shine a spotlight on a several Chicago streets in need of improved biking, walking, and transit options. First up: North Milwaukee Avenue in Wicker Park.

Milwaukee Avenue on Chicago’s Northwest Side is one of the busiest streets for biking in the entire country. During peak months, as many as 5,000 people a day bike along the street, often surpassing the level of motor vehicle traffic at rush hour.

Take our survey -- help improve Chicago’s bus service

Bus ridership has been declining significantly over the last several years. Why are fewer people riding the bus? There are many reasons for this decline, but we believe the central problem is that buses are often slow and unreliable. As a result, many are choosing alternative options when it comes to getting around the city.

How do you feel about Chicago’s bus service? Share your thoughts by taking our survey.

Private donation will accelerate full Lakefront Trail separation

Megan Williams, who was seriously injured in a Lakefront Trail crash, called it the best Christmas present she could hope for when Mayor Emanuel and the Chicago Park District announced hedge fund manager Ken Griffin donated $12 million to the city to create separated paths for people biking and people on foot along the full length of Chicago’s Lakefront Trail.

City unveils river trail concepts

Chicago city planners have unveiled draft concepts for extending the 606 to the east and building a seven-mile continuous river trail loop along the North Branch of the Chicago River.

Participatory budgeting funds walking improvements

In recent years, Chicago has become a global pioneer for a government spending method called "participatory budgeting."  

Participatory budgeting, or PB, is a system in which citizens are given a direct vote on how government funds are spent.  

In Chicago, this takes place at the ward level, with alderman allowing their constituents to decide how to spend the $1.3 million in annual “menu money” they receive from the city.