Chicago Central

2015 Downtown Bike Count needs volunteers

In May, the Chicago Department of Transportation's Complete Streets program will be conducting its regular Downtown Bike Count. To help with this process, CDOT needs volunteers to assist in downtown Chicago.

This bike count is conducted in the spring, summer and fall and records the number of bicyclists who travel in and out of Chicago’s Central Business District. 

Lakefront Trail construction projects to know about

People walk, run and ride bikes on the Lakefront Trail year round, but with spring blooming, trail users should expect trail use to grow over the next several weeks. 

Before you head out to the trail, you should know about some major lakefront construction projects that could affect your trip. 

Why removing the Kinzie bike lane is a bad idea

A bike network is only as strong as its weakest link, but a new proposal by 42nd Ward Alderman Brendan Reilly threatens to remove one of the most critical connections in Chicago’s growing network of protected bike lanes.

In an ordinance introduced in the Chicago City Council, Ald. Reilly is seeking to force the Chicago Department of Transportation to remove the Kinzie Street protected bike lane, located between Des Plaines and Wells Streets in the River North neighborhood.

Save the Kinzie St. bike lane!

On Wednesday, 42nd Ward Alderman Brendan Reilly proposed removing the Kinzie St. protected bike lane, Chicago's first protected bike lane and one of the most popular bike routes in the country. 

Chicago slips in Walk Score rankings

Making a city as vast and diverse as Chicago more walkable is an ongoing battle, and a new report shows there’s much more work to be done.

This week Walk Score released an updated list of the most walkable cities in the U.S. and, although Chicago’s score remained stable (74.8), our ranking dropped from fourth to sixth. 

Why institutionalizing speeding is a bad idea

In the latest Chicago Tribune story on the city’s photo enforcement program, the reporter quotes national safety experts who seem more concerned with keeping cars moving as fast as possible than making our streets safer.

Crain's op-ed: Rauner's budget to run transit off the rails

Our Executive Director Ron Burke has a strong op-ed in today's Crain's Chicago Business about Governor Rauner's proposed transit cuts:

"With more Chicagoans of all ages choosing to ride transit every year, we should be investing more to build a transit system that better serves our neighborhoods and connects people to job centers in the city and suburbs, rather than slashing funding for an already underfunded system."

Loop Link to make travel across Loop easier

The challenge of moving east or west across the Loop is familiar to anyone who has ever battled the daily congestion downtown, particularly during the morning and evening rush.

A new rapid transit corridor is designed to make those trips faster, safer and more convenient, whether you're walking, riding your bike or riding transit.

What can improve Chicago's streets?

Imagine, if you will, a city that features wide (and safe) sidewalks, an abundance of bike racks, bike workstations on street corners, and public gathering spaces with trees, landscaping and places to sit. What if that city was Chicago?

After gathering preliminary feedback, the Chicago Department of Transportation has launched a citywide text and online survey to seek input from Chicagoans regarding future improvements to Chicago’s public spaces.

Get involved with better transit in the Loop

Most commuters, visitors and residents in Chicago’s Loop can quickly identify the biggest transportation challenge: moving east-west across downtown.

Whether you’re walking, biking or riding transit, getting across the Loop is often frustratingly slow and unpredictable, particularly during peak rush hour times.