Exciting progress on the streets of Chicago!

It’s a thrilling time for cycling in Chicago. With 22 miles of protected and buffered bike lanes already built, and 8 more miles expected by the end of the year, Chicago is hurtling at warp speed toward achieving its goal of constructing 150 miles of protected and buffered bike lanes by 2015.

As Lee Crandell, Active Trans’ director of campaigns, explained in a recent Q&A with John Greenfield of Grid Chicago, this epic undertaking is terrific for people who bike, but they’re not the only people who will benefit. Protected and buffered bike lanes—sometimes called “green lanes”—make streets safer for everyone who uses them, no matter if you’re getting around via biking, walking or driving.

Another exciting development Crandell points out is Chicago’s emerging role as a national leader in the green lanes movement. Onward ho!

During this flurry of building new bike infrastructure, Active Trans has been busy reaching out to community organizations and alderman while rallying supporters around the city to speak up for better bikeways in their neighborhoods. “We’ve done a lot of presentations to community organizations,” said Crandell in the interview. “We’ve met with a lot of aldermen. Twelve aldermen in Chicago have signed on as our partners in support of a hundred miles of protected bike lanes.”

If you haven’t signed on in support, please do so. You’ll get updates and alerts. You can also watch the exhilarating progress being made via Active Trans' Chicago Bikeways Tracker and the interactive Bikeways Tracker map. 

The above photo of Lee Crandell comes courtesy of Grid Chicago. 

Just a bit of hyperbole?

Just a bit of hyperbole? "Chicago is hurtling at warp speed toward achieving its goal" I agree we are moving, but "hurtling" and "warp speed" are not words I would use!

On a related note, my house is about to move from the 1st ward to the 2nd ward through no fault of its own. What is Bob Fioretti's position?

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options

Recent comments

Copyright © 2014 Active Transportation Alliance | All Rights Reserved | Privacy policy